My Kombucha Recipes: You're Going to Love These Favorites!

If you have original recipes you'd like to share on this page, let me know.

Agave Kombucha

Most recipes for Kombucha tea contain granulated sugar. However, agave nectar can be substituted for the sugar. Agave makes a Kombucha that is a bit more sour than the traditional brew. Using some finished Kombucha from a previous batch and adding vinegar will hasten the fermentation and keep the pH acidic enough to discourage unfriendly bacteria.

  • 3 quarts water
  • 4 regular-size tea bags for black tea
  • 1 cup agave nectar
  • 1/2 cup kombucha from previous batch
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • Kombucha culture (scoby)

Bring 3 quarts water to a boil in a large pot. Add tea bags. Allow to steep for 15 to 20 minutes, or until very dark.

Remove the tea bags and stir agave nectar, Kombucha from previous batch, and cup apple cider vinegar.

Allow the tea to cool to room temperature. Pour the cool tea into a clean 1-gallon jar. Add the scoby.

Cover the mouth of the jar with a paper coffee filter, paper towel or cotton napkin, held securely with a rubber band.

Place in a draft-free area where temperature is a fairly constant 74 to 84 degrees for 6 to 9 days, until slightly effervescent. Then, store in glass or ceramic, refrigerated and tightly covered.

Ginger Lime Kombucha

Ginger and lime are a naturally refreshing combination. These fresh flavors can be added to the brew after you have fermented the Kombucha.

  • 7 cups water
  • 6 tea bags for green tea
  • 2 cups white sugar
  • Kombucha culture (scoby)
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and sliced thin

Bring water to a boil. Remove from heat, add tea bags, and allow to steep for 5 minutes. Remove tea bags.

Add sugar, and stir to dissolve. Allow to cool to room temperature. Pour tea into glass container. Cover with a paper coffee filter, paper towel or cotton napkin, held securely with a rubber band.

Place in a draft-free area where temperature is a fairly constant 74 to 84 degrees for 6 days.

Uncover the Kombucha and add lime juice and ginger. Cover, and return to same place to allow fermentation to continue, for 2 to 3 additional days or until slightly effervescent. Strain, and store in glass, refrigerated and tightly covered.

Sweet and Easy Kombucha

This basic formula is the one that yields a kombucha brew everyone will appreciate. You can use ordinary, generic supermarket tea bags, "family size" or the equivalent regular size. Figure three regular tea bags to one large tea bag.

These everyday tea bags, common teas like Lipton, Tetley, Bigelow, Upton, Twinnings, Salada or Red Rose, are typically a blend of orange pekoe and pekoe cut black tea. To make brewing simple, just leave the bags in the water until it is cooled to room temperature.

  • 7 cups water
  • 2 large tea bags
  • 1 3/4 cups white sugar
  • Kombucha culture (scoby)

Bring water to a boil. Remove from heat, add tea bags and sugar.

Stir gently to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature.

Remove tea bags, and pour tea into glass container.

Add the scoby.

Cover the mouth of the jar with a paper coffee filter, paper towel or cotton napkin, held securely with a rubber band.

Place in a draft-free area where temperature is a fairly constant 74 to 84 degrees for 6 to 9 days, until slightly effervescent. Then, store in glass or ceramic, refrigerated and tightly covered.

Cholesterol-Lowing Kombucha

Ernie at CajunErnie.com wrote, "In late 2001 my cholesterol level was 273. I stayed away from the popular drugs and thru better diet dropped it to 230. I then started drinking Kombucha because of my arthritis. By May, 2005 my cholesterol level had dropped to 165 and my blood pressure was at 122/54. Not bad for a 65 year old that works 60 hours a week."

Here's Ernie's recipe:

  • 7 cups water
  • 6 tea bags of green tea
  • 1 3/4 cups white sugar
  • Kombucha culture (scoby)

Bring water to a boil. Remove from heat, add tea bags and sugar. Stir gently to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature. Remove tea bags, and pour tea into glass container. Add the scoby.

Cover the mouth of the jar with a paper coffee filter, paper towel or cotton napkin, held securely with a rubber band.

Place in a draft-free area where temperature is a fairly constant 74 to 84 degrees for 6 to 9 days. Store in glass or ceramic, refrigerated and tightly covered.

Detox Kombucha

Kombucha is naturally detoxifying because it helps the liver release deposits stored there. You can add to this effect by incorporating traditional detox herbs.

  • 5 cups water
  • 6 tea bags for black tea
  • 1 3/4 cups turbinado sugar
  • Kombucha culture (scoby)
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried stinging nettle
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried dandelion leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried yarrow

Bring water to a boil. Remove from heat, add tea bags and sugar. Stir gently to dissolve sugar. Allow to cool to room temperature. Remove tea bags, and pour tea into glass container. Add the scoby.

Cover the mouth of the jar with a paper coffee filter, paper towel or cotton napkin, held securely with a rubber band.

Place in a draft-free area where temperature is a fairly constant 74 to 84 degrees for 6 to 9 days, until slightly effervescent. Then, store in glass or ceramic, refrigerated and tightly covered.

Bring 2 cups water to a boil. Add stinging nettle, dandelion leaves, and yarrow. Steep for 10 minutes. Strain, and cool to room temperature. Add herbal tea to finished Kombucha, and refrigerate.

Drink 6 ounces, 3 times a day for 10 days. Pause for one week and repeat.

Immunity Boosting Kombucha

Vitamin C is a helpful when you're fighting a cold or the flu. Kukicha is a tea made from the twigs of the tea plant, which are roasted. To obtain crystalline ascorbic acid, you can open one 500 milligram cap of Vitamin C.

  • 7 cups water
  • 2 tablespoons loose kukicha tea
  • 2 cups organic dehydrated sugar cane juicer
  • Kombucha culture (scoby)
  • Crystalline ascorbic acid

Bring water to a boil. Tie loose tea in a square of clean cotton fabric with a string, or use a tea ball. Remove from heat, add tea, and allow to steep for 15 minutes. Remove tea.

Add sugar, and stir to dissolve. Allow to cool to room temperature. Pour tea into glass container. Cover with a paper coffee filter, paper towel or cotton napkin, held securely with a rubber band.

Place in a draft-free area where temperature is a fairly constant 74 to 84 degrees for 6 to 9 days, until slightly effervescent. Then, store in glass, refrigerated and tightly covered.

To each 6 ounces add 500 milligrams of ascorbic acid, 3 times a day.

The twigs for this tea can be used to make an additional batch of kukicha tea if simmered for 10 minutes.